Joan van Barneveld / Manor Grunewald
Nicolas Lachance

Between the bars

Opening Sunday 6 November 2016 14:0018:00

Exhibition6 November 3 December 2016   

Exhibition views

PRESS RELEASE

(re)D. gallery is pleased to announce the second exhibition in its new gallery space. Between the Bars looks at how artists Joan van Barneveld, Manor Grunewald and Nicolas Lachance challenge the painterly medium using unconventional methods and printing techniques. Their practice is exemplary of a ‘post-medium condition’ where different mediums such as painting, photography and print start to blur and overlap. The works on display betray an outspoken preoccupation with image formation and invite the viewer to take time to delight in their poetic intensity and complexity.

Joan van Barneveld (°1978) has long been making dark paintings of desolate landscapes or gloomy interiors, delicately veiling photographic images with black paint. Being a musician and music producer himself, inspiration was mainly drawn from subcultures such as the punk rock or grunge scene. Recent years marked a shift to the use of bright images, overexposed as it were, and vivid colours through silkscreening. Van Barneveld studied at the Jan Van Eyck Academy in Maastricht (2015-2016). Recent solo shows were held at Museum Het Domein Sittard (2009) and Bonnefantenmuseum Maastricht (2016).

Manor Grunewald (°1985) is a self-taught artist with an expanded view on painting. Starting from found imagery, his pictorial compositions blot out the image’s presence with thinner, oil and spray paint. His search for abstraction materialises in a process of blurring, cropping, distorting and erasing that relates to printing and editing techniques. Grunewald’s work has been included in many solo and group exhibitions worldwide (in New York, Berlin, Paris, Brussels, Tilburg a.o.), and been awarded with several scholarships and prizes.

Nicolas Lachance (°1981) lives and works in Montréal, Canada. He manually constructs his images in a way that is similar to the photographic process. Lachance desires to liberate the colour (ink) from its support (paper) and transfer it to another support, the canvas. Intense, bleeding colours and rhythmic compositions dominate his recent canvasses, using laborious techniques of tracing and collage, with perplexing results. Lachance has had numerous shows in Canada, both solo and in group, and his work is included in several public and private collections.